Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Ike Ekweremadu, Wife Risk Life Imprisonment in UK

426

Former Deputy Senate President, Ike Ekweremadu and his wife, Beatrice, may be jailed for life if found guilty in United Kingdom.

Ekweremadu and his Wife were arrested and charged for bringing a child to the UK for organ harvesting.

Findings by our correspondent revealed Ekweremadu and his wife are being charged under anti- modern slavery laws and based on the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Ekweremadu and his wife will be imprisoned for life in United Kingdom if found guilty.

The Act reads at Section 4, “(1)A person guilty of an offence under section 1 or 2 is liable—
(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for life;

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or a fine or both.
(2)A person guilty of an offence under section 4 is liable (unless subsection (3) applies)—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years;

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or a fine or both.

(3)Where the offence under section 4 is committed by kidnapping or false imprisonment, a person guilty of that offence is liable, on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for life.

(4) In relation to an offence committed before section 154(1) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 comes into force, the references in subsections (1)(b) and (2)(b) to 12 months are to be read as references to 6 months.

Slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour

Section (1)

A person commits an offence if—
(a)the person holds another person in slavery or servitude and the circumstances are such that the person knows or ought to know that the other person is held in slavery or servitude, or
(b)the person requires another person to perform forced or compulsory labour and the circumstances are such that the person knows or ought to know that the other person is being required to perform forced or compulsory labour.
(2)In subsection (1) the references to holding a person in slavery or servitude or requiring a person to perform forced or compulsory labour are to be construed in accordance with Article 4 of the Human Rights Convention.
(3)In determining whether a person is being held in slavery or servitude or required to perform forced or compulsory labour, regard may be had to all the circumstances.
(4)For example, regard may be had—
(a)to any of the person’s personal circumstances (such as the person being a child, the person’s family relationships, and any mental or physical illness) which may make the person more vulnerable than other persons;
(b)to any work or services provided by the person, including work or services provided in circumstances which constitute exploitation within section 3(3) to (6).
(5)The consent of a person (whether an adult or a child) to any of the acts alleged to constitute holding the person in slavery or servitude, or requiring the person to perform forced or compulsory labour, does not preclude a determination that the person is being held in slavery or servitude, or required to perform forced or compulsory labour.

News.Band has reported that Beatrice Ekweremadu, 55, and Ike Ekweremadu, 60, have been remanded in custody.

The pair appeared at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court today (Thursday).

Charges were brought against the pair following an investigation by the Specialist Crime unit.

An investigation was launched in May this year after detectives were alerted to potential offences under modern slavery legislation.

A child has now been safeguarded, the Metropolitan Police added.

Organ harvesting is the removing of a person’s body parts, usually for sale on the black market and against the victim’s will.

The the Modern Slavery Act 2015 at Section 2 legislates against Human trafficking as follows:

(1)A person commits an offence if the person arranges or facilitates the travel of another person (“V”) with a view to V being exploited.
(2)It is irrelevant whether V consents to the travel (whether V is an adult or a child).
(3)A person may in particular arrange or facilitate V’s travel by recruiting V, transporting or transferring V, harbouring or receiving V, or transferring or exchanging control over V.
(4)A person arranges or facilitates V’s travel with a view to V being exploited only if—
(a)the person intends to exploit V (in any part of the world) during or after the travel, or
(b)the person knows or ought to know that another person is likely to exploit V (in any part of the world) during or after the travel.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: