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Nigerian workers’ paltry earnings contradict the country’s humongous wealth

DDM Editorial

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The Nigerian Government, after lengthy foot-dragging, has come out to announce a paltry 60,000 Naira as minimum wage.

The temerity to pay its workers a pittance, a stark contrast to its boasts of economic prosperity, is alarming.

The meager earnings of Nigerian workers is a national disgrace, a slap in the face of decency, and a blight on the nation’s wealth.

The proposed minimum wage of N60,000 (approximately $43) is a mockery, a paltry sum that fails to honour the efforts and sacrifices of Nigerian workers.

In contrast, workers in other African countries, such as Seychelles, Libya, Morocco, Gabon, South Africa, Mauritius, and Equatorial Guinea, earn significantly higher minimum wages, ranging from $150 to $456.

This gross disparity is a testament to the government’s callous disregard for the welfare of its citizens.

Nigerian workers are not just underpaid; they are exploited, forced to survive on wages that are a fraction of what their counterparts earn globally.

The minimum wage in the United States is around $1,160, while in the United Kingdom, it’s approximately $1,400.

This stark contrast highlights the government’s failure to prioritize fair compensation for its workers.

For a start, we endorse the view of Femi Emmanuel Emodamori, a Nigerian lawyer, who advocates for a jumbo pay for Nigerian workers.

His call is a realistic reflection of the country’s economic potential and international standards.

Anything less is a betrayal of the trust placed in the government to protect the welfare of its citizens.

We condemn the government’s lack of commitment to fair compensation for Nigerian workers.

It is a scandal that perpetuates poverty, inequality, and social injustice.

Diaspora Digital Media demands a review of the proposed minimum wage to reflect the true value of Nigerian labour.

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