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CRASH: Israel, US could be involved in president Raisi’s death, says India Air Force veteran

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M. Matheswaran, an India Air Force veteran doubts whether the helicopter carrying Mr Ebrahim Raisi simply got lost in the fog given the amount of precautions that would have gone into planning the president’s travel arrangements.

Speaking with RT news, he cited instances of what is going on in Gaza with the Israelis involved in various assassination attempts, and the US always sanctioning Islamic nation, and various assassination activity they have done, one cannot rule out sabotage.

“In the context of what’s happening in Gaza with the Israelis involved in various assassination attempts, and the US constantly sanctioning them, and various assassination activity they have done, one cannot rule out sabotage,” he told the paper.

Although, Tehran has not confirmed the cause of the unfortunate crash yet.

NewsBand earlier reported that the Iranian president Ebrahim Raisi died after his helicopter crashed amid heavy fog in northern Iran. Raisi was 63.

Rescuers on Monday found the chopper that was carrying the Iranian president, as well as the country’s foreign minister Hossein Amirabdollahian and other senior officials, after it crashed in the mountainous northwest reaches of Iran.

The crash comes as the Middle East remains unsettled by the Israel-Hamas war, during which Raisi, under Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, launched an unprecedented drone-and-missile attack on Israel just last month.

Under Raisi, Iran enriched uranium closer than ever to weapons-grade levels, further escalating tensions with the West as Tehran also supplied bomb-carrying drones to Russia for its war in Ukraine and continued arming proxy groups in the Mideast such as Yemen’s Houthi rebels and Lebanon’s Hezbollah.

Raisi was a prominent figure in Iranian politics, known for his alignment with conservative and hardline factions. He had been serving as president for nearly three years and was widely expected to run for re-election next year.

Born in Mashhad, a significant religious center for Shia Muslims in northeastern Iran, Raisi’s journey into politics was deeply rooted in his religious education.

He studied at the renowned seminary in Qom, under the guidance of prominent scholars, including Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the current supreme leader of Iran.

His black turban, a symbol that he was a sayyid, or a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, held special significance among Twelver Shia Muslims, further cementing his religious and political stature.

Raisi’s career as a prosecutor began in various jurisdictions before he moved to Tehran in 1985. There, he became a part of a controversial committee of judges responsible for the execution of political prisoners, a role that drew significant criticism from human rights organizations.

Raisi’s untimely death leaves a significant void in Iran’s political landscape. As the nation mourns, questions about his potential successor and the future direction of Iranian politics loom large.

 

 

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